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Gallatin Gateway Inn has been one of the valley’s most interesting landmarks since its opening on June 18, 1927.

It was owned and operated by The Milwaukee Road Railroad. At the time there was an electrified railroad branch line that connected the trains mainline at Three Forks, Montana to the Inn.

It had all the modern amenities of the day and was one of the first hotels in Montana to have phones in the rooms. Its proximity to Yellowstone Park made it a very popular destination for tourists.

Park buses ran a shuttle service to and from the hotel to Yellowstone Park.

The hotel got a major make over in the 1980s and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on January 24, 1980.

Tough Times For The Inn

The Inn closed in February 2012 after lengthy court battles with the owners and their financial institution. M&M Hospitality purchased the Inn in 2013 but never reopened it.

It looked as though the historic landmark, packed with Southwest Montana history, might once again fall into disrepair and neglect.

Yellowstone Club To The Rescue

The Yellowstone Club, Spanish Peaks and Moonlight Basin have signed a five-year lease with the current owner to house about 90 employees at the historic Inn.

The Yellowstone Club will foot the bill for any improvements that need to be made and employees are expected to move into their new quarters by the beginning of December.

Perks for the employees will include dinners at the Inn as well as a continental breakfast.

Some Final Thoughts

During my working life I was privileged to do some work with the Gateway Inn. Walking in the main entrance my shoes always made that echo that you never forget as the history swirls around you.

It was a little like walking into something like the Overlook Hotel in the Stephen King novel, “The Shining.” While Gallatin Gateway is much smaller the feeling of strolling though past lives and events was not lessened by its size.

I’m glad to hear that it has found a way to survive after nearly 100 years of operation.

If you have been fortunate enough to attend a function, wedding or other event then you know what I’m talking about.

If not well maybe someday your chance will come.

The Yellowstone Club might be accepting applications.

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