Montana is now the latest state to reject the National School Board Association (NSBA) following their efforts to label and investigate parents as "domestic terrorists." On Tuesday, the Montana School Boards Association's executive board voted unanimously to terminate their membership with the NSBA.

The MTSBA also stated their intent to coordinate with other states to establish a new national organization to advocate on their behalf.

The MTSBA included this summary of their motion to terminate their membership in the NSBA:

The MTSBA Board passed its motion following extensive analysis and discussion of the gradual decline in NSBA’s focus on supporting community ownership and excellence of public schools over the last decade. Despite extensive efforts to help NSBA regain that focus, the MTSBA Board concluded that NSBA currently lacks the leadership necessary to bring about the fundamental change for NSBA to regain its important role as an advocate for excellence in public education through school board leadership.

The executive summary also clearly went after the national association for their continued antics:

NSBA’s leadership continues to persist in ineffective behaviors that negatively impact state school boards associations, member public school districts, and the children served by our K-12 public schools as is evidenced by the recent letter authored by the Interim CEO and the President of NSBA to the Biden Administration.

Montana is the latest in a string of states to rebuke the NSBA, according to The Daily Caller:

A slew of state school board associations condemned the NSBA’s letter since its publication on Sept. 29. Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana and Alabama are in the process of “reevaluating the benefits” of membership in the NSBA. Other states such as Ohio and New Hampshire have opted to nix their membership altogether.

Here is the full memo from the Montana School Board Association: attachment-Final Executive Summary of Motion[78652]

Read More: Parents as Terrorists? The Montana School Board Assoc. Weighs In |

 

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